Updated article on Laryngopedia!

Chronic bacterial laryngitis is seen in persons who have undergone radiotherapy or who have an immune defect. The laryngitis can often be improved with antibiotics, and hydration / environmental humidification when dryness is part of the problem. It often recurs when antibiotics are discontinued: https://buff.ly/3esAiRn

Holiday Hours

We will be closed on Friday, December 24th in observance of Christmas Day.

We will also be closed on Friday, December 30th in observance of New Year’s Day.

We wish you a happy and safe holidays!

700 and counting!

We have successfully assisted our 700th patient in finding relief from R-CPD, or the inability to burp! Thank you to our patients who shared their success stories on places such as TikTok, Facebook and Reddit.  We will continue to offer tele-conversations, in-office consultations, and Botox injections for those who are interested in learning more, or who are ready to find relief. https://buff.ly/2SE7cHo

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New video about babies who can’t burp

Babies and older children with this condition are in misery, and so are their parents, with the stress of it all. The answer might be a dysfunction of the upper esophageal sphincter (Retrograde Cricopharyngeus Dysfunction, or R-CPD).

 

Ground-breaking publication by Dr. Brent Richardson about RRP

Dr. Brent Richardson is one of 4 clinicians at Bastian Voice Institute who together manage a large population of adult patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP).  RRP is caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV), which in turn stimulates growth of benign proliferative lesions called papillomas, similar to warts.  State-of-the-art management remains precise surgical removal of papillomas when the lesions regrow sufficiently to cause hoarseness or rarely in adults, airway obstruction.  Looking for a medical alternative to surgery, Dr. Richardson’s ground-breaking pilot study of three patients used an investigational oral anti-viral medication called Brincidofovir.  The medication appeared to reduce the amount of disease and prolong the interval to regrowth of lesions in these three patients.  Given these encouraging results, further study is needed, because the behavior of RRP is so variable. Dr. Richardson is pursuing the possibility of a larger clinical trial with the drug’s pharmaceutical sponsor and developer.  To view the abstract of his study, click this link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/00034894211007227